The Effect of the Norman Invasion on Anglo Saxon Landscaping

The introduction of the Normans in the second half of the 11th century irreparably altered The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. Landscaping foto At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. But before focusing on home-life or having the occasion to think about domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire population. Most often built upon windy summits, castles were fundamental constructs that enabled their inhabitants to spend time and space to offensive and defensive schemes, while monasteries were rambling stone buildings commonly added in only the most fecund, extensive valleys.

Gardening, a placid occupation, was unfeasible in these fruitless fortifications. The purest specimen of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture existent today is Berkeley Castle. It is said that the keep was developed during William the Conqueror's time.

An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an obstruction to attackers attempting to excavate under the castle walls.

On one of these terraces lies a stylish bowling green: it is covered in grass and flanked by an old yew hedge that is formed into the shape of rough ramparts.